NPR: Get My Vote (National Public Radio, Cecilia Munoz, NCLR)

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National Public Radio (NPR) has launched a new site called "Get My Vote" (getmyvote.npr.org), at which they solicit commentaries from their listeners describing what presidential candidates have to do to get their vote. Visitors can submit commentaries in video, audio, or text form. Think of it as a Volvo-driving version of the Youtube/CNN debates, although without any debates. They don't say anything about playing the commentaries for the candidates, only that they might be used on the air.

And, in keeping with the fine, NPR tradition, their pole position video is from Cecilia Munoz of the extremist-funding and -awarding National Council of La Raza (link). I left a comment, reprinted in the extended entry below. Why did they choose her as their keystone video, rather one from someone who supports our immigration laws? I have absolutely no idea. No, none at all.

If someone would like to raise the issue about the allocation of their publicly-derived funds (npr.org/getmyvote/about.html) - and try to make sure that they offer something approaching equal time to pro-borders groups - feel free to contact your representatives.

I may submit something at some future time, such as "in order to get my vote you have to discredit NPR over their 'debate'", or perhaps something else.

On the other hand, they do seem to have discovered one way to get hits.

UPDATE: I just noticed that the end of the video indicates that it was an NPR production.

Here's the comment I left on the Cecilia Munoz video:

"Immigrants" aren't Americans: an immigrant is someone who hasn't yet become a citizen. Once someone is a citizen, they might be a former immigrant, but they're no longer an immigrant. Why is that important? Because those who support illegal immigration - such as the NCLR - constantly try to blur the lines between the different varieties of immigration and the different statuses. So, for instance, when CM refers to "her community", what exactly does she mean? Does that include naturalized citizens, all Latinos, Mexican-Americans, immigrants, or what? And, considering, for instance, a recent NCLR study that suggested going easy on illegal aliens who'd been charged with identity theft, it's hard not to believe that her "community" includes illegal aliens. So, a reporter asking her about the costs of her "community" makes much more sense when you're familiar with the NCLR, including CM's attempts to play the victim and smear those who, unlike the NCLR, support our laws.

Comments

NPR Is the DNC And is working for foreign money and its ideals are one with mexico city, it wants you dead, you can't fight your enemy with love or your enemy will rape you.