ACLU of Georgia's highly flawed racial profiling report based only on anecdotes; dedicated to promoters of anti-American bill

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The Georgia chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union has released a report on alleged racial profiling in Gwinnett county in that state [1]:

1. Despite admitting that they have no data that would back up any claims of profiling [2], they convict the sheriff's office anyway.

2. Lacking any hard data on possible profiling in that county, all they do is print ten anecdotes. All but one are from those who didn't want their names used; the only one with a name attached is based on something she witnessed. As far as I can determine, there's nothing in their report providing any independent corroboration that their anonymous sources are telling the truth is provided. There appears to be nothing indicating that they interviewed additional, possibly impartial witnesses. There appears to be nothing indicating that the interviewed police officers or officials of some kind about the alleged incidents. One would have to take the word of the ACLU taking the word of self-interested parties to believe what's in the report. Is anyone outside the far-left willing to do that?

3. This is in the frontispiece:

Published March 2010, on occasion of the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. This report is dedicated to the Trail of DREAMS walkers who visited Georgia and Gwinnett County in March 2010 and inspired us with their courage.

That Day is a project of the United Nations and I'm going to guess that - as with their other programs - it has certain hidden surprises masked by a benign and laudatory name. And, the Trail walkers are supporters of the Dream Act, an anti-American bill that would take college educations away from lower-income U.S. citizens in order to give them to illegal aliens.

4. In a report about racial bias, they show their own biases:

Although complaints have come largely from Latino drivers, Gwinnett County also has large Asian and African immigrant populations, and it is likely that these communities are similarly victimized by this form of racial profiling.

Are working class whites also victims of profiling based on their race? Why isn't the ACLU concerned about that? Why do they assume that everything revolves around whites oppressing non-whites? (Answer: because they're very far-left).

[1] acluga.org/GwinnettRacialReportFinal.pdf
[2] They admit they have no data:

Aside from 287(g) stops, the GCSO [Gwinnett sheriff's office] does not have any policies mandating their office to document an individual’s race or immigration status when they stop or detain an individual. GCSO officers must only document an individual’s race when they issue a citation or warning to that individual, or draft an official police report. However, the officers are not required to document an individual’s race for a stop that does not result in a citation... Yet, without such data, it is difficult to determine whether these officers are making stops and arrests based on a proper basis of reasonable suspicion or probable cause, or on the improper basis of race and ethnicity. Indeed, the testimonies in this report indicate that at least some police officers within Gwinnett have based their decision to stop, detain, or arrest an individual on race and ethnicity, in clear violation of the constitutional and international legal standards... Specifically, without proper documentation of the stops, detentions, and arrests conducted through use of 287(g), there is no way to ensure that GCSO officers are not engaging in discriminatory practices in violation of Paragraph XI of the MOA and federal civil rights law.

Note, of course, that the "testimonies" are from those whose names aren't given and whose stories weren't independently corroborated as discussed above.