Lou Holtz on immigration

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Former Notre Dame football coach Lou Holtz spoke at a function associated with the GOP Convention, and lightweights like Betsy Woodruff of the Daily Beast [1] and Jonathan Chait [2] are outraged beyond their abilities.

Certainly, this part of what Holtz said is wrong and counter-productive (see the post about IAmThe53 for why):

"A lot of people make a living by the way they vote. Forty-seven percent of people make a living by the way they vote. They can make a living by the way they vote, but they can’t make a life."

And, calling mass immigration an "invasion" isn't a good idea. However, this part expresses, in a not-unexpected lunkhead way, a universal truth [3]:

New immigrants to this country, he continued, need to learn and speak English and "become us."

"I don’t want to become you,” he continued. “I don't want to speak your language, I don’t want to celebrate your holidays..."

That part of Holtz' speech opposes cultural domination: one cohesive group moving into a country and changing things in unwanted ways. That's not welcome in any country outside the U.S. and it shouldn't be welcome here either. For instance, imagine that even more Americans moved to Mexico and started demanding bilingual phone menus, ballots, etc. Mexican citizens would rightly object. Imagine that the U.S. government paid French broadcasts to work English words into their broadcasts. French citizens would rightly object to that. Imagine that Saudi Arabia funded an effort to bring Israel's Arab population to 51%. Israeli Jews would rightly object.

There are some cultural aspects in some countries that it's a matter of human rights to eliminate, but overall people live in countries with established cultures, they like it that way, and they don't want a competing culture to move in and take over. There's nothing wrong with that, and it isn't the same as not accepting borrowings (like pizza and hamburgers) or having animosity towards foreign people or ideas.

Obviously, some people disagree and they fall into two camps: those cowed into disagreeing because they fear getting called names, and those who either don't care or who willingly want to change the U.S. in ways that current U.S. citizens don't want. The first group needs to be helped to grow spines.

The second group includes libertarians, the cultural far-left, corrupt politicians (left and right), racial power groups, business groups, and so on. They need to be vanquished; see the many other posts at this site for how to do that. We need smarter leaders to express Holtz' points about immigration in much smarter ways and aggressively defend those points. So far there's no leader who's willing or able to do that, but with enough pressure one might appear.

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[1] thedailybeast . com/cheats/2016/07/19/lou-holtz-goes-on-immigrant-bashing-rant-at-rnc.html

[2] nymag . com/daily/intelligencer/2016/07/gop-speaker-lou-holtz-really-hates-immigrants.html

[3] The end of that Holtz quote is "I sure as hell don’t want to cheer for your soccer team!" Given the fact he seems to have meant that as a joke given his profession, it isn't as incredibly stupid as Ann Coulter's comments about soccer.