guest workers

guest workers: Page 1

Discussed in (click each link for the full post):

GOP "Standards for Immigration Reform": how it's wrong, how it won't work, what you can do - 01/30/14

The GOP "Standards for Immigration Reform" have been released. It's a short summary of the guidelines the Republican Party leadership will use for their own amnesty push.

First I'll quote the full document, followed by a discussion of some of the ways it won't work and it misleads. That's followed by some very effective things you can do to stop the GOP effort.

Darrell Issa to introduce mass immigration legalization plan for illegal aliens ("halfway" means full amnesty) - 10/23/13

GOP Rep. Darrell Issa plans to introduce ( peekURL.com/zWHTfwc ) a plan that would legalize most illegal aliens in the U.S. for a period of six years.

Ben Powell promotes Red Card plan, H1Bs using shaky economics (immigration, Forbes) - 10/19/13

In Forbes, Ben Powell of Texas Tech University offers "A U.S. Worker Shortage Calls For 'Red Card' Immigration Reform" ( peekURL.com/zKuax6f ). A discussion of how the article is wrong follows this excerpt:

Jason Stverak misleads about immigration and the free market (Franklin Center, Koch, Krieble) - 10/04/13

In Forbes, Jason Stverak of the Franklin Center for Government and Public Integrity offers "To Achieve Real Immigration Reform, Put The Free Market Front And Center" ( peekURL.com/zYzhdmf ).

AFL-CIO reaches agreement with Chamber of Commerce on guest workers - 02/21/13

Richard Trumka and Tom Donohue - respective heads of the AFL CIO and US Chamber of Commerce - have released a "Joint Statement of Shared Principles" on a guest workers progr

Marco Rubio is delusional or tries to deceive on legalization (immigration, amnesty) - 01/12/13

Marco Rubio continues selling out both the GOP and the U.S. with his plans for comprehensive immigration reform (aka amnesty). See his name's link for his past efforts that have harmed the U.S. and for a discussion of why his immigration ideas won't work.

Very likely Rep. Trey Gowdy will help push immigration amnesty - 01/08/13

Rep. Trey Gowdy of South Carolina is the new head of the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration and Border Security. Despite what you might hear from Gowdy and others, it looks like he's weak on comprehensive immigration reform (aka amnesty, aka some sort of large illegal alien legalization program).

Don't be fooled by Lincoln Club of Orange County's immigration plan (Robert Loewen) - 12/03/12

Last month, the Lincoln Club of Orange County released a "Policy Statement on Immigration Reform" [1]. Their plan is - in a word - delusional. I'll quote the most delusional part of their plan, and explain why it wouldn't work as they want you to think it would.

Howard Buffett shouts "Viva Mexico!"; supports amnesty and guest workers; enables illegal immigration; wins Mex. govt award - 12/02/12

That very long title is more than justified since Howard Buffett - son of Warren Buffett - has been very busy supporting very bad immigration policies.

GOP platform supports Arizona-style laws, but includes guest worker program - 08/21/12

First the good news about the newly-passed GOP platform. From [1]:

The official party position now reads that "State efforts to reduce illegal immigration must be encouraged, not attacked," and says the Department of Justice should immediately drop its lawsuits against controversial state immigration laws in Arizona, Alabama, South Carolina and Utah.

Mitt Romney NALEO speech: ever weaker on immigration (chain green cards, comprehensive reform, guest workers) - 06/21/12

Mitt Romney spoke to NALEO - the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials - earlier today and went even weaker on immigration. Excerpts of his remarks, a discussion, and video are below.

Texas 2012 GOP platform goes "liberal" on immigration (IRCOT, Koch) - 06/09/12

The Texas GOP has passed their 2012 platform, and it includes an immigration plank that some will present as somewhat "liberal" or "lenient".

Mitt Romney already weakening immigration position? - 04/02/12

Laura Meckler of the Wall Street Journal offers some more evidence that Mitt Romney might be weakening his somewhat favorable immigration position in preparation for the general election (link).

Newt Gingrich didn't know what 287(g) is; uses loose borders shibboleth (plus the usual immigration speech) - 03/02/12

In an interview with WXIA of Atlanta, Georgia (link), Newt Gingrich admitted not knowing what the 287g program is; see the link if you aren't fam

Rick Perry's unworkable immigration idea: work visas for illegal aliens (John King, CNN, secure the border) - 11/04/11

Rick Perry appeared on CNN's John King show yesterday and supported an unworkable plan: giving work visas to the millions of illegal aliens in the U.S.

2006: George Will supports amnesty, guest workers; misleads with false choice; "unlimited" skilled immigration - 07/03/11

On March 30, 2006, George Will offered "Guard the Borders--And Face Facts" ( peekURL.com/zc35tkk ), which was designed to support George W Bush's push for comprehensive immigration reform.

With millions unemployed, Ag Secy Tom Vilsack demeans American workers, promotes amnesty, opposes enforcement, uses bogus talking points, opposes eVerify - 05/27/11

Secretary of the Department of Agriculture Tom Vilsack held a press conference on Wednesday in which he demeaned American workers, promoted immigration "reform", opposed immigration enforcement, and used a series of bogus immigration talking points.

An account of his remarks is here, with more excerpts at [1].

1. Vilsack ran down American workers, saying: "While some American citizens step up and take (farm) jobs, the truth is even when farmers make their best effort to recruit a domestic workforce, few citizens express interest. In large part that's because this is hard, tough work." The idea that growers want to recruit Americans is more than a bit dubious; many run down American workers as much as Vilsack. Growers tend to prefer lower-wage, more compliant illegal aliens. And, we sent a man to the moon and won World War II, now Vilsack falsely says that most Americans don't want hard work. That's also more than a bit dubious because a good percentage of those doing farm work are in fact Americans. And, there's the fact that the presence of large numbers of illegal aliens tends to reduce farm wages at the same time as decreasing safety in farm jobs.

The pro-American alternative would be for Vilsack to oppose illegal immigration and push something like this plan to get unemployed Americans working temporary farm jobs until the economy improves. That would answer the labor shortage complaints of farmers, improve working conditions on farms, and would save money overall (considering that most of those unemployed will be getting unemployment insurance and considering the costs of illegal aliens).

2. Vilsack supported comprehensive immigration reform, aka amnesty. See the link for the downsides of that plan [1].

3. One of the key selling points of immigration "reform" is that it would include stepped-up enforcement. Vilsack seems not to be such a fan of enforcement, saying: "It's difficult to know when someone is documented and when someone isn't. It's difficult when there are efforts at enforcement that basically disrupt not only undocumented folks but also documented … which we've seen in some of the processing facilities." If "reform" passed, does anyone think Vilsack would do a 180 and support "disrupt[ive]" immigration raids?

4. Vilsack used a long list of bogus talking points. The first item above is the jobs Americans wont do canard, but there were several more. From the article:

Reforms would result in "a reliable, legal workforce," said Vilsack. Reforms would also:

* Continue efforts "to secure the borders."
* Hold accountable "businesses that break the law by undermining American workers and exploiting undocumented workers."

The first is secure the border. The second is what boils down to the immigration wage floor. See both links.

Vilsack also used the deportations false choice, saying "The reality is, if you tried to deport all 12 million it would take several hundred years. That isn't practical." See the link for how he tried to mislead.

Vilsack - just as his boss, George W Bush, and dozens of other hacks have done - used the system is broken canard [2].

5. Vilsack also ran down the eVerify program, at least as a standalone solutiion, saying: "The E-Verify system creates a potential difficulty, particularly for smaller businesses... That's because they'd have to invest resources in equipment and training to participate."

Vilsack was accompanied by Bob Stallman, the president of the American Farm Bureau Federation, who engaged in crops rotting in the fields scare tactics:

"Our concern is that without a legal agricultural guest worker program in place – or without comprehensive immigration reform – you have roughly 500,000 workers out there that, frankly, would be screened out (by) a mandatory E-Verify program. If that happens, the risk of production losses, or production moving outside the country, is very real... If you just put in a mandatory E-Verify program, there's suddenly a huge gap in agricultural that must be filled from somewhere. Otherwise, the crops won't be planted and harvested. That's the reality."

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[1] Vilsack: "There needs to be a comprehensive immigration system that deals with the 12 million people here, many working in our farm fields."

[2] Vilsack: "I've met farmers and ranchers all over this country who are worried about the broken immigration system... Simply put, our broken immigration system offers little hope for producers trying to do the right thing and make a living...

Shurtleff says Feds won't sue Utah over guest worker scheme (from Utah Compact to America's Compact?) - 04/08/11

Utah recently passed a "guest workers" bill that would have them in effect using a Mexican state as an employment agency. One problem from the perspective of the supporters of the bill: the bill appears to be illegal under federal law, meaning that at the least Utah would need some sort of waiver in order to proceed with the scheme.

Needless to say, that's not an issue (link with video). Bearing in mind that things could change (for instance if enough people complain to the U.S. Congress), Utah AG Mark Shurtleff gives the not-too-surprising news that the Obama administration is in his corner:

In an interview with FOX 13, Utah Attorney General Mark Shurtleff revealed that the Justice Department has agreed not to sue Utah over its controversial guest worker bill. At the same time, federal officials are looking at a plan he and other immigration advocates are pushing called the "Utah Compact."

...Shurtleff says federal officials are responding favorably to the plan and are talking about creating "America's Compact."

“Nationally law enforcement, business and faith based communities in addition with all of the others can be a voice for comprehensive immigration reform,” said Shurtleff.

See the last link above for more on the Compact; it would encourage more illegal immigration in addition to other negative impacts.

Utah gov. Gary Herbert signs "guest" worker, other immigration bills - 03/15/11

Utah governor Gary Herbert has signed (link) a bill that would create a state-level guest worker program with a Mexican state (see that link for the details). The bill would also reward illegal immigration, encourage more illegal immigration, lower wages for American workers, and even their legislature admits it's unconstitutional.

Regarding the last:

Utah Attorney General Mark Shurtleff said he has been in discussions with the Obama administration regarding the state's desire to work cooperatively with the federal government to obtain the necessary waivers, exemptions or authorizations to implement the Utah laws, which will not go into effect until July 2013.

The eyes of the nation are on the "reddest of the red states" for its take on reforming immigration laws, Shurtleff said. "They are looking at Utah as a model to do that," he said.

On the perhaps bright side (with a perhaps greater chance of being enacted too), other bills Herbert signed dealt with enforcement and employment verification. However, signing the guest workers bill is at least a symbolic loss, and it's one that probably could have been prevented if opponents had used something like the question authority plan. One tea parties group had, to their credit, opposed the guest workers plan, although they weren't present at the signing ceremony.

There's also this:

Asked what was the LDS Church's public position was on the immigration bills, [Presiding Bishop H. David Burton of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints] said the church had endorsed the Utah Compact. "We feel that the Legislature has done an incredible job in a very complex issue," Burton said.

See the last link for the huge downsides of the Compact.

Utah to start own "guest" worker program, collaborating with Mexican government; Shurtleff; HB466 - 03/02/11

Utah is pushing to start their own state-level guest workers program, and they hope to work with the Mexican government (specifically the state of Nuevo Leon) to do it. This program will almost assuredly reduce wages for Americans in that state, it will probably lead to more illegal immigration (due to the network effect), and it will probably also lead to more mixed status families (i.e., Mexican citizen parents and U.S. citizen children).

Their first step is a bipartisan bill (HB466) sponsored by state senator Curt Bramble and state representative [Stephen Sandstrom and promoted by Utah Attorney General Mark Shurtleff. Per this:

The bill would create a 27-member commission comprised of legislative leaders in both parties, legislators, the attorney general, state department heads and residents. It would study the economic, legal, cultural and educational impact of illegal immigration and develop a plan to use migrant workers in the state.

It also would authorize the governor to negotiate an agreement with the state of Nuevo Leon in Mexico to provide workers to Utah. The project would be evaluated after a year to determine whether the state should consider agreements with other countries.

You can read HB 466 here. Note that the ten citizens appointed to the Commission would no doubt all or almost all be on the pro-mass immigration side. Those citizens selected would have to come from one of:

(i) an immigrant or immigrant-serving, community-based organization; (ii) a philanthropic organization; (iii) an advocacy group; (iv) a business, including an immigrant entrepreneur; (v) a union; (vi) academia; or (vii) a faith-based organization.

Only iii would include someone who'd be opposed to "guest" workers, mass immigration, or illegal immigration. And, just as with other panels elsewhere, there's a strong chance that they'd be at the most just a setup person.

The "guest" worker program is described here:

(1) With the assistance of the attorney general, and subject to Section 63G-12-302 , the governor may negotiate and enter into a memorandum of understanding with the government of the State of Nuevo Leon, Mexico, through its Migrant Attention Center to create a pilot project known as the "Migrant Worker Visa Pilot Project" under which Utah businesses may obtain legal foreign migrant workers through use of United States nonimmigrant visas.
...(1) Under the pilot project memorandum of understanding, the governor may commit the state, including the commission, to work directly with officials of the government of the State of Nuevo Leon, Mexico, including the Migrant Attention Center, to encourage, facilitate, and support the migration of legal Mexican migrant workers from the State of Nuevo Leon to Utah for the purpose of filling jobs with Utah businesses most in need of skilled and unskilled migrant labor.
(2) The pilot project and the pilot project memorandum of understanding shall:
(a) be compatible with the Immigration and Nationality Act, 8 U.S.C. Sec. 1101 et seq., and federal policies, procedures, and requirements for issuing United States nonimmigrant visas to Mexicans qualified to participate in the pilot project, with particular attention to the following:
(i) a Utah business hiring an alien through the pilot project shall demonstrate and certify that there are not sufficient workers where that labor is to be performed who are able, willing, qualified, and available at the time of application for a United States nonimmigrant visa; and
(ii) the employment of the alien will not adversely affect the wages and working conditions of workers in Utah who are similarly employed;

Such a program would add to the labor supply and would necessarily impact the wages of Americans in Utah doing low-wage work. Then, connected growers and manufacturers would "certify" that they can't find jobs for those newly-lowered-wage jobs, pulling tricks and strings to do so.

And, those "guests" would assist with the "network effect": they'd tell their friends about Utah and if those friends can't get into the program they might decide to go there illegally, knowing that they'll find a support network in place. Some of those "guests" will have U.S. citizen children, increasing the chances that they'll decide to stay in the U.S. illegally. And, for those who decide to stay, raising the possibility of "separating families" and giving yet another chip to the far-left and the Dems to support amnesty.

If a "guest" doesn't leave when their time is up, a provision would notify the Department of Homeland Security, and agency that's shown little interest in deporting non-criminal illegal aliens away from the border.

This is basically just a crooked scheme that will lower U.S. wages and increase illegal immigration.

3/8/11 UPDATE: The bill has passed and apparently awaits governor Gary Herbert's signature; you can contact him at utah.gov/governor/contact . State representative Chris Herrod says he'll help anyone who wants to sue Utah over illegal immigration (link). Whether anything like that would fly or not isn't clear, but overall the best way to oppose things like this is through plans such as question authority. A smart, experienced trial lawyer "cross-examining" Herbert or another politician over this issue on video destined for Youtube would send a strong message to other politicians and might prevent "guest" programs like the one described above. The problem - the same problem that's existed for the four+ years I've been promoting the question authority plan - is finding anyone else willing to get involved.

And, former George W Bush lackey Alfonso Aguilar weighs in (link):

"This is a common sense, market-based approach that balances immigration enforcement with measures that are supportive of the needs of Utah businesses and are also welcoming of immigrants," said Alfonso Aguilar, executive director of Latino Partnership for Conservative Principles.

Aguilar said the bills would allow Utah's illegal immigrants to live "without the fear of being detained and removed from the country," assuming the federal government goes along with the plan.

Haley Barbour lobbied for Mexican government, now misleads about amnesty - 02/15/11

Mississippi governor Haley Barbour is so bad on immigration that in 2001 he lobbied for the Mexican government on a "mini-amnesty". If you aren't familiar with that government's activities inside the U.S., see that link.

Now that his lobbying activities [1] have come to light, he's responded by misleading about amnesty and promoting very bad policies. From a statement he released in response [2]:

"Before there can be immigration reform, we must secure our borders. Only after that can any reforms be achieved, and those can’t include amnesty... Everybody knows we are not going to put ten or twelve million people in jail and deport them. Once the border is secure, we should develop a responsible guest-worker program and it can’t include amnesty."

1. As it says on the secure the border page, when someone harps on securing the border *first*, you have to ask them what comes next. Thankfully, in his case he's making it clear: some form of legalization program. See #4.

2. He's using the reform not amnesty canard. His "reform" would be perceived by millions of potential illegal aliens as amnesty, no matter what he wants to call it. See that link for the details.

3. He's using the deportations false choice canard, pretending that we must choose between mass deportations and legalization when there are other options, including attrition.

4. The guest worker program he promotes would result in one of two things: either a very large underclass of "second-class non-citizens" akin to the situation of Turkish "guests" in Germany, or some form of "path to citizenship" in which former illegal aliens would eventually be able to become citizens. The last is more likely, and it's certainly the one that the Democratic Party would pull out all the stops to obtain starting from Day One. So, most likely his plan would turn out to have the same effect as amnesty, even if applicants had to jump through a few minor hoops first. See the comprehensive immigration reform and guest workers pages for more.

But, wait, there's more. Barbour's press office has responded to [1] with this:

In their work on immigration issues, BGR [Barbour's lobbying firm] never advocated amnesty for illegal aliens.

Barbour's lobbying concerned Section 245(i) of the Immigration Act (link) which involved allowing certain illegal aliens to adjust their status, i.e., become legalized and get a green card. See the description in [1]. Getting a green card put them on the "path to citizenship". So, word games aside, what he was lobbying for was in fact amnesty.

ADDED: We know Barbour promoted amnesty, but it's important to use his terms if you ever get a chance to discuss this with him. If you ask him about supporting amnesty, he'll do what John McCain and others do: simply deny he supports amnesty. So, that will go nowhere. If you get to ask Barbour a question, it has to be about specific aspects of what he supports and you need to make sure you aren't letting him deflect the question by playing word games.

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[1] From this:

According to a Justice Department filing by Barbour's former lobbying firm, The Embassy of Mexico decided to retain Barbour's services on August 15, 2001, to work on, among other things, legislation that would provide a path to citizenship for foreigners living illegally in the United States—what opponents of immigration reform call “amnesty.”

“Haley Barbour and I will lead the BG&R team,” wrote Lanny Griffith, Barbour's former business partner, in the filing. According to subsequent filings, Barbour's work included “building support in the legislative branch for passage of a bill related to Section 245(i) of the Immigration and Nationality Act.” As part of that work, Barbour's firm arranged meetings and briefings with “Senators, members of Congress and their staffs, as well as Executive Branch Officials in the White House, National Security Council, State Department, and Immigration & Naturalization Service.” Barbour's firm charged Mexico $35,000 a month, plus expenses.

At the time, Mexico was seeking an extension of a provision that allowed undocumented immigrants living in the United States to receive legal visas or green cards without returning to their country of origin, provided they pay an additional fine. In practice, the provision generally helped out undocumented family members of legal immigrants or undocumented immigrants who were eligible for visas based upon certain job skills. Without the provision in place, undocumented immigrants who received legal papers had to return to their country of origin, for three or 10 years, before returning to the U.S. The Congressional Research Service estimated that an extension would benefit about 300,000 undocumented immigrants.

At the time of Barbour's lobbying, the 245(i) effort was referred to as “mini-amnesty” in conservative circles.“This amnesty loophole allowed aliens who broke our laws to pay a $1,000 fine and go to the head of the line in front of prospective immigrants who complied with our laws,” opined Phyllis Schlafly, founder of the Eagle Forum, in a 2002 column.
Among the other supporters of extending 245(i) was President George W. Bush, who had called for an extension of the provision before meeting with then-Mexican President Vincent Fox in 2002. The Republican-controlled House of Representatives voted out the extension, but in the post-September 11 atmosphere, the extension failed to win approval in the Senate.

[2] hotair.com/archives/2011/02/14/
barbour-lobbied-for-mini-amnesty

Newt Gingrich supports some parts of DREAM Act; supports guest workers; uses false choice; sounds like Hoffenblum - 12/06/10

The audio below (also at peekURL.com/vkhylh1 ) has Newt Gingrich clarifying his immigration stance to Laura Ingraham. A round-up is here. In the interview, Gingrich supports at least one part of the anti-American DREAM Act:

"I think that it’s legitimate to say, if you’re willing to risk your life for two or three years, serving to protect the United States, we will be willing to consider you for citizenship."

However, he claims to oppose broad programs that would give a "pathway to citizenship", preferring instead the more George W Bush-like approach of a massive guest workers plan. Such a plan would have huge social costs such as are to be found in Germany. And, the children of those "guests" would be U.S. citizens, making it very difficult to deport them. Our "guests" would never leave but instead would stay here as second-class citizens of a sort.

And, he also sounded like Allan Hoffenblum:

Gingrich replied that no election, including the Colorado governor race that saw the openly anti-illegal Tom Tancredo lose to his Democrat rival, has been won on the idea that 11 million people can be deported. This led to a heated argument between the two conservatives, with Ingraham saying that both Republicans and Democrats have “fallen down” in their basic responsibility to enforce the border.

Tancredo supports attrition rather than mass deportations, so Gingrich either doesn't know or lied about Tancredo's position. And, Gingrich engaged in the deportations false choice by failing to acknowledge attrition as an alternative to mass deportations or a legalization program.

And, as with every other hack, Gingrich supports secure the border:

Gingrich said he is in favor of deporting illegals who are gang members or arrested for a felony, and is “committed 100-percent” to enforcement of the US border, noting his past accomplishment as Speaker when he helped enforce the first control of the San Diego border. He also said he committed to having English as the official language of government.

In other words, he does want to deport hundreds of thousands of illegal aliens, but he thinks 11 million is too many to deport. And, whether he'd support English only laws is unclear, but it is slightly ironic since Newt Gingrich is promoting bilingualism.

UPDATE: Gingrich's position is even worse. He spoke with Univision's Jorge Ramos (a Mexican citizen) and said (link):

Newt Gingrich: And our very deliberate goal, as with the San Antonio Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, is we’re talking about how can we create a space that is sort of center-right, pro-jobs, pro-entrepreneur but where the entire Hispanic community feels comfortable arguing, talking, and thinking. We’re going to be putting the DREAM Act on that space and we hope to have, before the beginning of the year, with Jeb Bush’s efforts and others, a very lively debate about whether or not we can develop a step by step solution to help everybody in America come out from outside the law and find a way to ultimately have every person in this country living within the law. That’s got to be our goal.

...Jorge Ramos: So if you say, as one of the most prominent Republicans, that you are for immigration reform, you know many Republicans are going to follow you. They are going to follow your lead. Are you for immigration reform?

Newt Gingrich: I am for immigration reform and the person who I think has had the most courageous position in this is Jeb Bush. Jeb Bush is co-author of a report on immigration reform, which is much bolder than the Republicans will be ready to be in Washington, but he moves us in the right direction.

McCain (of course) is soft on DREAM Act; laughs about anti-American plan (trade Americans for illegal aliens) - 09/15/10

The video at peekURL.com/vbjwqf9 shows a John McCain appearance where a group of illegal aliens ask him to support the anti-American DREAM Act:

Meg Whitman highlights how much she agrees with Jerry Brown, still misleads about immigration - 07/16/10

Meg Whitman offers "Americans must come together to address the problem of illegal immigration" (meg4.me/hvud, [1]), which is basically a rewrite of the previous misleading Whitman editorial about immigration. Since the new editorial and the old one repeat the same lines, see that link for part of why she's misleading, and the below for additional reasons.

But, first, here's this admission that should be more than a bit shocking to many of the Republicans who chose her over Steve Poizner (bolding added):

In this race, my Democratic opponent, Jerry Brown, has said very little about most issues, including immigration. However, from what he has said, former Governor Brown appears to share many of my positions on immigration. He, too, is against Proposition 187 and opposes Arizona's new immigration law. Former Governor Brown joins with me to oppose (drivers licenses) for illegal immigrants. He has endorsed tougher sanctions against employers who hire illegal immigrants and spoken out against sanctuary cities, and he opposes blanket amnesty that would grant full-citizenship rights without first requiring illegal immigrants to pay a fine and learn English... Clearly, when examining our positions on immigration, there is very little over which Jerry Brown and I disagree.

In other words, she's the same as a Democrat on immigration. If you're a Republican who supports our immigration laws and who opposes amnesty, and you helped nominate Whitman, how does that make you feel?

She then goes on to make the misleading statement that neither she nor Brown support amnesty; she's playing words games as discussed on the reform not amnesty page.

She also supports massive immigration:

If the next great inventor lives in India, China or Mexico today, we should welcome that inventor coming to America legally to create jobs and prosperity here.

Why exactly? Why should we braindrain the world? Isn't it - in the long run - better for us not to braindrain the world? What if, in order to get one inventor we have to allow 100,000 non-inventors to come here; is that worth it? What if those coming here have "baggage" of some kind, such as continuing to be loyal to their countries of origin? Whitman's breezy, blanket policy shows that she hasn't thought about this in depth.

If a segment of our economy has a shortage of American workers, then we should look across our borders for guest workers who can help American businesses succeed by working here legally, but without full U.S. citizenship.

Obviously, with about five workers for every available job, the last thing we have is a shortage of workers. What position would we be in if we had a Whitman-style program now? Would we be able to deport our "guests", or wouldn't the far-left and the Democrats work to keep them here? Considering that's what they're doing regarding illegal aliens, the answer to that is clear. And, what she supports would lead to building up a class of "legalized illegal aliens"; the Democrats and the far-left would try to build them into a power base and their status would cause social problems. And, of course, many of them would have U.S. citizen children making it difficult to ever deport them. See guest workers for more.

Then, this highly misleading statement:

Finally, our doors should always be open to honest and well-intentioned people facing the terror of political oppression in their homelands. Closing our doors to legal immigration would be counter to everything our nation stands for.

The most any political leader wants is a moratorium, and even under a moratorium we'd still allow refugees. Whitman is just trying to mislead people; hopefully no one should be surprised at that by now.

[1] Full URL:
megwhitman.com/experience_detail.php?id=7991

Before donating to Human Rights Watch, ask them about child labor on U.S. farms - 06/02/10

When it comes to immigration matters, far-left organizations love to complain about various downsides of a situation and at the same time support policies that make the situation worse. An example is offered by "Fields of Peril: Child Labor in US Agriculture", a recent report from Human Rights Watch [1]. If you're considering sending them money, please read the following first.

Why Michael Gerson can't be trusted on Arizona's immigration law - 04/28/10

Former George W Bush speechwriter Michael Gerson continues to be an attack toy poodle for the Bush family, this time offering "A test of Arizona's political character" in the Washington Post (link). I'm going to outsource most of this to Byron York (link) and fill in some of the gaps.

Gerson starts with no less than two hoary talking points in one paragraph:

[Chaos on the border] is an argument for effective border enforcement. It is also an argument for a guest-worker program that permits an orderly, regulated flow of temporary, migrant laborers, allowing border authorities to focus on more urgent crimes than those resulting from the desire to provide for one's family.

See safe legal orderly for others using what Gerson transcribes as "orderly, regulated". Note that the last part is the busboys canard. See also guest workers.

He says:

The law forbids the use of race or ethnicity as the "sole" basis for questioning. So what are the other telltale indicators? ...Gov. Jan Brewer, who signed the law, looked flustered when asked during a news conference the obvious question of how illegal immigrants might be identified... Yet Brewer has ordered Arizona police to be trained in the warning signs of illegality -- signs that she cannot describe. There is a reason no Arizona official has publicly detailed these standards -- because the descriptions would sound like racial stereotyping. And probably would be.

Bear in mind that the preceding appears in an article promoting border enforcement, which would be done by the Border Patrol and other agencies such as ICE. Those and similar groups have decades of experience at being able to tell illegal aliens from citizens and legal immigrants and visitors, and all without the legal armagedon that Gerson concern trolls about. No doubt there will be a few cases of local yahoo cops crossing the line, but with the proper guidelines and training - something that Brewer is developing - that can be mitigated.

Gerson ends with the false establishment take on Proposition 187; see my long discussion of Proposition 187.

Sarah Palin goes bogus: "It all comes down to securing the border" - 03/26/10

Sarah Palin has some good qualities, but also bad qualities. And, some of the many latter involves her knowing nothing about immigration, Palin supporting McCain's position on immigration during the campaign, and her just today supporting McCain's worthless posturing on immigration.

Chuck Schumer, Lindsey Graham mislead about their amnesty scheme (3/18/10 edition) - 03/18/10

Senators Charles Schumer and Lindsey Graham - the "dastardly duo" - take to the pages of the Washington Post to offer "The right way to mend immigration", outlining a comprehensive immigration reform scheme they're going to try to push

Indiana gov. Mitch Daniels on immigration: not good, but not enough information for full picture - 02/26/10

Indiana governor Mitch Daniels is being mentioned as a fiscal conservative, policy wonk Republican candidate for president in 2012. Like most "fiscal conservatives", he appears to support massive/illegal immigration despite the costs involved and despite how it gives even more power to those on the other side from him.

Martha Coakley immigration position: ignored status as DA; supports massive immigration - 01/16/10

The audio at verumserum.com/?p=11595 has a radio interview with Martha Coakley about immigration. She doesn't appear to be a raving loose/open borders loon, but her position is bad, she admits that she wasn't fully doing her job, and part of her position is quite "business-friendly". See [1] for a discussion of the not-fully-correct video and the headline at the page, but the more important thing is her position:

Helen Krieble's absurd Red Card "Temporary" Workers "Solution" - 06/23/09

Helen Krieble - president of the Vernon K. Krieble Foundation, an heir to the Loctite fortune, and an associate of Dick Armey - has been pushing her own guest workers plan for a few years.

McCain won't support union-driven immigration "reform" push; other uncertainties - 04/19/09

Change to Win and the AFL CIO recently joined forces to promote comprehensive immigration reform. Now. per this, John McCain says:

"The current plan being developed by the administration and organized labor calls for immigration reform that does not adequately address either securing the border or a legal temporary worker program and is a plan I cannot support... We need to act on the pressing issue of border security now, and then seek comprehensive immigration legislation that includes a temporary worker program... Any legislation that does not address these two key components is not real reform."

Various union officials are quoted as strongly behind the plan, but the article also quotes an unnamed Democratic congressional aide:

"There will be some back and forth, to say the least, on the commission idea."

That commission would set future immigration levels; obviously, the Democratic Party's leaders want as many future voters as possible.

Josh Marshall /TPMTV misleads about Michelle Bachmann - 03/24/09

It's apparently open season on Michelle Bachmann [1], so TPM TV - run by Josh Marshall [2] - offers the attached misleading video entitled "The Bachmann Effect". Leaving the other two segments aside, the middle segment takes her comments out of context and shows how little Marshall/TPM understand about immigration issues.

Mitt Romney's giant, amorphous guest worker scheme? - 02/01/08

As pointed out a few times, it's difficult to find out exactly what Mitt Romney's immigration policy is. In the past, he's hinted at attrition, but as far as I know he's never come out explicitly for it and defined it in the depth that Fred Thompson did.

Vicente Fox: FTAA common currency (Amero), Hillary for president, Bill Richardson, driver's licenses, lies about heathcare... - 10/11/07

On Monday's Larry King show, former Mexican president Vicente Fox:

* Said that the Free Trade Agreement of the Americans (FTAA; called in Spanish ACLA) on which he worked with president Bush was to, long-term, include a common "Latin American" currency. Since that agreement would apply to the U.S., the currency would apply here as well...

* Promoted immigration from Mexico, "guest" workers, and NAFTA...

* Lied about U.S. citizens not paying the healthcare costs for illegal aliens...

* Agreed with Felipe Calderon's claim that "Mexico does not stop at its border"...

* Promoted driver's licenses for illegal aliens...

* Said he wants Hillary Clinton to be president and called Bill Clinton a "great man"...

* Said that Bill Richardson was a "excellent man" and that "he's so Mexican in his interior"...

Transcript here; excerpts in the extended entry.

The first point resulted in this:
Former Mexican President Vicente Fox confirmed the existence of a plan conceived with President Bush to create a new regional currency in the Americas, in an interview last night on CNN's "Larry King Live."

It possibly was the first time a leader of Mexico, Canada or the U.S. openly confirmed a plan for a regional currency. Fox explained the current regional trade agreement that encompasses the Western Hemisphere is intended to evolve into other previously hidden aspects of integration.
Fox' statement resulted in Les Kinsolving asking about it:
A spokeswoman for the White House has denied any knowledge of a discussion between President Bush and former Mexican President Vicente Fox where the two, as Fox confirmed, conceived a plan for a regional currency for the Americas.

Spokeswoman Dana Perino also said she's not aware of any plan for such a currency either...
Whether that's worth a plugged Amero is left up to the reader's judgment.

FOX: ...And so I am not claiming for open borders to everybody. What I am claiming for is a decision, an intelligent decision with a vision to the future, because the United States needs that energy to support the elderly, to support the pension plans, to be competitive in front of Asia and China. And it's a must.

...KING: ...In his state of the union address [Calderon] said, "I have said that Mexico does not stop at its border, that wherever there is a Mexican, there is Mexico."

Do you agree with that?

FOX: Yes. Yes. But I also put my feet on the ground or my boots on the ground. And I understand the problem. But we must deal with problems. We must deal with challenges...[blathers on...]

FOX: ...and give a driver's license, because you need a driver's license only to those who know how to drive, and you will be much more secure to have those guys driving with a driver's license, the insurance and everything all together, instead of them driving without a license and without any I.D.

..FOX: ...[promotes guest workers]

...KING: ...We have an e-mail question from Patricia, Oxnard, California: "Why should the American public have to pay for medical care of illegal immigrants from Mexico? Why shouldn't we be able to bill the government of Mexico for care given to their citizens?"

FOX: Patricia, let me tell you that you're not paying for medical care for undocumented workers...

FOX: ...what I see is fear dominating people here -- or some people here because it's still, I would say that a majority of your citizens would go along with a reform, done with a proper intelligence and solve this problem once and for all and convert it into win-win situation.

KING: [who does he want for president?]

FOX: A lady [i.e., Hillary] would be my choice... [Bill Clinton is a] Great man. [Jimmy Carter's great too] ...[his "Fox Center" is] associated with the Rand Corporation in Santa Monica, California, the largest think tank in the world. They are going to open an office in San Cristobal, in the farm by the side of the center so that we will work on developing knowledge and research together.

...[Bill Richardson is an] Excellent man. I mean, he's so Mexican in his interior, I like him a lot. And he's a good governor. Good man.

...KING: E-mail from Mrs. Gonzalez in Elizabeth, New Jersey. "Mr. Fox, I would like to know how you feel about the possibility of having a Latin America united with one currency?"

FOX: Long term, very long term. What we propose together, President Bush and myself, it's ALCA, which is a trade union for all of the Americas. And everything was running fluently until Hugo Chavez came. He decided to isolate himself. He decided to combat the idea and destroy the idea...

KING: It's going to be like the euro dollar, you mean?

FOX: Well, that would be long, long term. I think the processes to go, first step into is trading agreement. And then further on, a new vision, like we are trying to do with NAFTA.

KING: How is NAFTA doing?

FOX: Excellent. Mexico's seventh largest trading economy in the world... So we account for hundreds of thousands of jobs in this economy in the U.S.

Curt Thompson: Urges Calm and Practicality - 10/03/07

link: galeo . org/story.php?story_id=0000003303

State Sen. Curt Thompson: Urges Calm and Practicality, "stay calm, stay put and get involved"

Found in Mundo HispanicoWritten by Senator Curt ThompsonPosted on 2007-07-11

Originally published in Spanish in Mundo Hispanico on July 5, 2007.

Posted on GALEO on 7/10/07 in English, courtesy of Sen. Curt Thompson. This version is unedited and is slightly different than the print version. The Spanish print version was edited for space.

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