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Rove: Bush admin doing "darndest things" to reduce illegal immigration

Fresh from pandering to the far-left racial power group NCLR, Karl Rove spoke before the Aspen IdeasFestival:

...Rove said the immigration system was "absolutely broken" relative to illegal entrants. He expounded in detail about efforts to diminish illegal crossings, including the number of repeated attempts by Mexicans, whom he said account for 85% of illegals. He said six million illegal immigrants are estimated to have entered the country since 2001. "We're doing the darndest things you can imagine," to improve the situation, and have had success in such areas as reducing the number of days captured illegal immigrants are detained.

Gosh golly darn it, they're doing the best they can! Sure, only fining three employers in 2004 for employing illegal aliens is a little low, but goshy golly gosh, they're doing better! Next year, they might manage to fine five, maybe even six employers.

Of course, the fact that they admit to six million illegal aliens entering the country on the Bush's administration's watch should pretty much prove to anyone who had any sort of doubt that Rove is simply lying, and the Bush administration is the most effective supporter of illegal immigration this country has ever known.

"We've got to have a temporary border program that allows people to come hear for a reasonable time. We know people do not come here to stay in America...most of Mexicans want to get a nest egg and go home."

Of course, the experience of every guest worker scheme ever devised absolutely proves that most "guests" won't go home. And, of course, once they have U.S. citizen children there's very little chance of those who don't want to go home being deported.

Rove also said it was impractical and destabilizing to consider forcing 10 million to 12.5 million estimated long time illegal immigrant cohort to "get the hell out of here," and it would have a disruptive economic impact as well.

I don't know where the "cohort" came from, but that statement is close to the strawman argument about mass deportations.

Perhaps some brave person at the conference might have asked Rove at that point what might happen if we indeed did try to deport even just a million illegal aliens. Would they riot? And, since at least six million illegal aliens have entered on Bush's watch, hasn't Bush put the U.S. at tremendous risk of civil disturbances? Then, as a follow-up, they could have asked Rove whether doing putting the U.S. at such risk is an impeachable offense.

"We'd better do something about this in a compassionate way, or we're going to find that our country has lost something really vitally important," he urged, adding resentment and fear of immigrants was not new, but needed to be overcome once again. "We are a great country.... There's no Filipino dream, no Japanese dream, no Italian dream, but there is an American dream."

As pointed out here endless times, encouraging massive immigration from Mexico is hardly compassionate. And, everything else in Rove's comment can be answered by our current legal immigration system. Perhaps he should concentrate on that.

And, perhaps someone should ask him some tough questions the next time he blathers on.

Politics · Wed, 07/19/2006 - 04:38 · Importance: 1

Thu, 07/20/2006 - 12:31
dchamil
dchamil7.blogspot.com/

I can confirm D. Flinchum's statement that this is well worth a read. It brings to mind Bertolt Brecht's quote about the government electing a new people -- one more to their liking.

Wed, 07/19/2006 - 10:04
D Flinchum

New from CIS and well worth the read:

Immigration and Usurpation: Elites, Power, and the People's Will
by Fredo Arias-King
Center for Immigration Studies Backgrounder, July 2006
http://www.cis.org/articles/2006/back706.html

EXCERPT: '... If mass immigration from Latin America has debatable benefits for the United States as a whole, if a majority of the American people is against it, and if immigrants cannot vote until they become naturalized (which can take years after their arrival), why would nine-tenths of the legislators we spoke with be so keen on increasing immigration?
...
Also curiously, the Republican enthusiasm for increased immigration also was not so much about voting in the end, even with 'converted' Latinos. Instead, these legislators seemingly believed that they could weaken the restraining and frustrating straightjacket devised by the Founding Fathers and abetted by American norms. In that idealized 'new' United States, political uncertainty, demanding constituents, difficult elections, and accountability in general would 'go away' after tinkering with the People, who have given lawmakers their privileges but who, like a Sword of Damocles, can also 'unfairly' take them away. Hispanics would acquiesce and assist in the 'natural progress' of these legislators to remain in power and increase the scope of that power. In this sense, Republicans and Democrats were similar. ...'

Wed, 07/19/2006 - 09:26
Fred Dawes

"Oh God", none of you get it at all, so you and your kids will BE killed off one by one! how sad to see a people walk right into hell and not get why!
Guns can make you free of a totally corrupt enemy government that wants you dead,dead,dead, that is what congress and the bush rats want above all other things and the weapon is mass third world population.

Wed, 07/19/2006 - 08:37
Katie's Dad
americankernel.com

Actually, creating a guest worker program is the least "compassionate" way to handle this for Mexico's long-term future. Mexico has developed an adolescent-like attachment to the "allowance" it gets in the form of cash transfers from illegal aliens it sends to the US. Because of our stupidity-laced compassion, it learns nothing of how to bring itself out of the dregs of the third world: It has no reason to try.

True compassion would have the best interests of a strong future for Mexico in mind, which can best be attained by our plugging all the holes that ease the pressure on Mexico's leaders to reform. Admittedly, Mexico has a long way to go; considering its tolerance for corruption, cultural commitment to la mordida bribery and clannish antipathy for education, it is unlikely that the nation can ever even envision itself as prosperous unless there is some wholesale housecleaning in all of its institutions. I don't know if Mexico can ever realize its full potential because of the things that are entrenched in its culture. But it surely will never rise to even an admirable mediocrity for as long as we allow it to be our parasite.

The left, illegal-alien-apologists in the Bush administration, obfuscators of the McAmnesty bill in the Senate and others act as liberal parents of juvenile delinquents might if junior's grades were to tank after he started skipping school: give him a good, stern talking-to with no real consequences. Conservative parents would, at the very least, cut off junior's allowance and ground him.

Those who bemoan the immigration restrictionists' lack of compassion are confounding true compassion with greed. Illegal alien advocates who demand our compassion have at lease one of the following hidden motives: a desire to gain votes, an addiction to cheap and compliant labor, a hope to fill a few more pews, or a plan to create and capture unassimilated ethnic vote blocs. And there are some who desire continued mass immigration for the sole objective of obliterating American cuture, its sovereignty and its very existence.

Compassion is incredibly over rated.

Wed, 07/19/2006 - 05:41
eh

As pointed out here endless times, encouraging massive immigration from Mexico is hardly compassionate.

Depends on how you look at it maybe. Clearly illegals have better material lives here (even if they live in poverty), or else they wouldn't come, or more of them would leave on their own. So it's in their interest to be here, no question. In that sense, you could say it is "compassionate" of the US to 'reform' immigration in a way that allows them to stay.

But there is a (rather obvious) question in all of this: Is illegal immigration in the best interest of the US and its citizens? Definitely not (IMO). Going further, even if we 'reform' immigration to allow those who now enter illegally to do so legally, would that be in our best interest? Again, no (IMO). While we can all see the human interest angle, US politicians and authorities need to be worrying about what is best for the US, not what is best for aliens.

Rove is a cretin -- he proves it every time he opens his mouth.