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Lawyer Julie Pace sues Arizona over e-Verify, suggests filing late to crash system

Julie Pace and David Selden are lawyers with the Arizona firm Ballard Spahr Andrews & Ingersoll, and they're representing a coalition of business groups fighting against a new Arizona law set to go in effect on January 1. The law would require employers to use the federal e-Verify system to verify the identities of new hires; if they knowingly hire illegal workers their business licenses could be suspended or revoked.

From this:
If the judge upholds the law, lawyers plan to tell employers to sign up en masse during the last two weeks of December, Pace said. The notices will be sent out by e-mail through chambers of commerce and trade associations, she said.

Even if the computer system doesn't crash, the government doesn't have enough manpower to answer all the questions that will be generated as employers try to navigate the system for the first time, she said.

"If you have 100,000 people signing up in December, how are they going to handle it?" Pace asked.
This provides a partial list of those being represented: Arizona Contractors Association, the Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry, the Arizona Farm Bureau Federation and the Arizona Restaurant and Hospitality Association.

This is similar to the fears some had that, under "comprehensive immigration reform", groups would encourage applicants to apply on a specific day of the week or the month in order to swamp the system and push through every application. And, her scheme is only slightly less repugnant than that of the H1-B lawyers featured on this infamous clip.

Immigration2007b · Tue, 11/27/2007 - 21:20 · Importance: 4

Wed, 11/28/2007 - 06:18
Edward

The lawyers need to have their seditious little behinds sent to live with Sheriff Joe. Lawyers take an oath to uphold the laws of the nation, and the state in which they practice. Guess these guys forgot which nation they live in. Therefore, as a 'gentle reminder', AZ should seriously consider immediate disbarment and prosecution. Then yank the license from the entire law firm. Sedition and treason are still considered crimes by most judges and prosecutors. Most, anyway.

Wed, 11/28/2007 - 07:54
Tanstaafl
age-of-treason.blogspot.com/

If only we had DAs and prosecutors that would bring charges.

Wed, 11/28/2007 - 15:07
Mary

That joke about two lawyers at the bottom of the ocean being a good start is so wrong....I'd START with at LEAST ONE THOUSAND of Them!!

Wed, 11/28/2007 - 16:24
Tom Shuford
www.ednews.org/authors/117/Tom-Shuford-Columnist-EdNews.org

The lawyers are "representing a coalition of business groups." Victor Davis Hanson is a central California farmer and widely-read military historian. The excerpts below are from Hanson’s BookTV.org presentation on “The Immigration Solution,” co-authored by Hanson, Heather Mac Donald, and Steve Malanga at the Manhattan Institute, October 29, 2007. They help explain why cheap illegal labor is such as sweet deal business and such a bad deal for citizens: “To diagnose this problem [illegal immigration] we use the Latin phrase, “Cui Bono?” Whom did it benefit? “...It was very illiberal to welcome people from Jalisco or Oaxaca, use their . . . body capital, so to speak — there’s no finer worker in the world than to have a roofer or farm laborer, [an] eighteen or nineteen [year old] unattached male. “...Yet as people age — and these types of occupations, whether it’s on your knees . . . sixteen hours laying concrete or picking peaches with 50 pounds on your stomach, a person’s not designed to do that for twenty or thirty years . . . so we notice that in all these small towns people in their 40s and 50s and 60s were not working as they had and yet they were being replaced by younger workers, and the employer was de facto throwing them out onto the entitlement industry to pick up the costs when their bodies literally . . . gave out . . . “...Now the argument was that there’s a shortage of workers but . . . I was struck that often places where illegal immigration was highest the unemployment rate was also high. In California in the late 90s, the Central Valley had an 11 percent unemployment rate and yet the California Farm Bureau said that — in the case of Fresno County — if they did not have 30,000 workers from Oaxaca in any particular summer, it would not harvest — fill in the blanks — peaches, raisins, grapes. “....We had the manpower but psychologically or spiritually or morally, we were not able to inculcate to our own youth and, indeed, to second generation children of citizens . . . who where children of illegal aliens that it was an enobling experience to go out and do physical labor.” For the full presentation — about ten minutes per presenter — followed by 20 minutes of Q & A, Click on “WATCH” at this link: http://www.booktv.org/program.aspx?ProgramId=8790&SectionName=&PlayMedia=No

Thu, 11/29/2007 - 18:00
Tanstaafl
age-of-treason.blogspot.com/

Decent pay will "inculcate" people with the proper motivation to do manual labor. That is after all what motivates the invaders. The pay which is so piddling to us is great wealth to them. A secure border will ensure that decent pay for natives is forthcoming. No need to impose wage controls. Just secure that which has always been secured by all nations at all times through history. Hanson is a neocon tool. He knows enough about history to know that this is not going to end well for the citizens of a borderless Rome, uh, the West.

Tue, 01/08/2008 - 12:37
Bob G
www.bobgriggs.com

That an officer of the court would advocate this action is incredible. But, hey, December came and passed without a system crashing.... thank you for proving that E-Verify can handle the additional traffic! Verification is easily and painless... business folks, it is just a way to verify that you are obeying the law in your hiring practices. And you are obeying the law, aren't you? www.AreMyEmployeesLegal.com