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Appeasing our cheap labor supplier

Mexican Nationals to Get New U.S. Trials

WASHINGTON — The Bush administration is asking Texas to conduct new hearings for 51 Mexicans on death row who say they were denied legal help from their consulates in violation of international law.

The International Court of Justice (search) in The Hague last year ruled that the convictions violated the 1963 Vienna Convention (search) by not providing the Mexicans with consular access. In 1969, the Senate ratified the treaty, which requires such access for Americans detained abroad and foreigners arrested in the United States.

The Supreme Court filing is an attempt by the administration to quell international criticism...

Maybe giving him a new trial is the right and not just the expedient thing to do, maybe it isn't.

However, the worrisome side effect in this matter is that this follows months of anti-U.S. activity by our "friends" to the south, all of which they've admitted are attempts to get a "migration accord" passed. See "Mexico may ask international courts to block Proposition 200" from earlier this year and "We're being sued by Mexico" from last year. The second post has more about Mexico's larger strategy. Are we sure that "cheap" labor isn't costing us more than we thought?

Immigration2005a · Tue, 03/08/2005 - 16:53 · Importance: 1

Tue, 03/08/2005 - 23:51
John S Bolton
www.johnsbolton.net

The Mexicans have long since made clear that they believe that their people have the right to commit any acts of aggression in this country. This stamps that nation with a leading subhuman character. To appease them, is like appeasing the subhuman demands that led to WWII; it causes a great increase in the aggression. Our scholars and the more intelligent officials know that this is the result of appeasing demands for freedom for aggression. It is for that reason, that one can know that they want war to come with the Mexicans; that is, a war larger that what is already underway. They want it because it allows for an expansion of power, and for the scholars, a chance to dream of dystopia imposed by a more powerful state.