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The PIIPP to end all PIIPPs

As you'll recall, a PIIPP is a "pro-illegal immigration puff piece." It must advocate for illegal immigration and the person to whom we're to feel Sally Struthers-level sympathy for must appear in the first sentence.

And, I believe I've spotted the PIIPP to end all PIIPPs in the New York Times. Presenting "Behind Top Student's Heartbreak, Illegal Immigrants' Nightmare":

Angela Perez looked up from her desk at International High School in Queens one morning last April to behold a most uncommon sight. Her best friend, Lydia, the one who shuffled into homeroom late every day, had scampered in ahead of the bell. "Guess what?" she called to Angela, and from her backpack she pulled a thick envelope. It held the letter admitting her to Tufts University...

[Angela nad Lydia are best friends, sharing joys, dreams, hopes for the future, etc. etc. etc...]

[... but there are dark and stormy storm clouds on one of these students' horizons...]

Unlike Lydia, her soul mate in so many other ways, Angela is an undocumented immigrant, and under federal law, state university systems have been financially pressured not to provide affordable resident tuition to such applicants...

[... but, never fear! Help is on the way from those who say our immigration laws mean nothing... Begin peppy music...]

Now a bipartisan coalition of legislators has recognized that students like Angela are, in fact, among the most responsible of Americans, those who carry the burden of parents' sacrifices and who seize upon public education as their route to productive citizenship. In both the Senate and the House of Representatives, lawmakers have introduced bills to permit these immigrant students to regain resident status in their home states and, even more important, to earn citizenship in part by graduating from college, allowing them to enter the workforce legally...

[The DREAM Act] has fallen victim to the Republicans' internal split on immigration, which pits cultural nativists against free-marketeers, as well as the overall shift in federal immigration policy toward border control and internal surveillance since Sept. 11 attacks. Trent Duffy, a deputy press secretary to the president, said yesterday that "certain parts" of the Dream Act deserve "serious consideration" as part of a "better, more humane, and open immigration system..."

[... it gets even worse...]

OK, you've probably read enough. Please contact sgfreedman@nytimes.com or, better yet, public@nytimes.com.

Maybe you could suggest they provide teary puff-pieces about those U.S. citizens negatively impacted by the DREAM Act and similer legislation.

I provided this link above, but just to make this clear, here's what Dan Stein of FAIR says:


[With the DREAM Act, Orrin Hatch] and his colleagues are literally taking opportunities and tuition assistance away from the children of citizens and giving them to illegal aliens... Supporters of this bill are unabashedly placing the interests of illegal aliens above American families who have paid taxes and played by the rules..."


Immigration_piipps · Wed, 09/01/2004 - 11:15 · Importance: 1

Fri, 07/29/2005 - 17:07
Andy Fernandez

You seem to talk about Hispanic Illegal residents only, well you are very mistaken, there are Irish, Italian, Australian, Polish (people that "look" like your entire family), as well as many other illegal residents from the entire world in this country (Even though Mexican illegal residents are the largest percentage). So the term "Wetback" should be erased from your minuscule brain. Be politically correct when addressing your racist single minded views, at least for the sensible reader.
Your opinions I do not care for, yet we are in America and therefore I must respect the foreign.
I would advise you to read more on the IRS and who does pay taxes. You would be surprise at the amount of money the IRS holds from no other than whom? Illegal immigrant tax payers, whom pay taxes through what is called and ITIN number (not a TIN number) look it up!
Illegal immigrants are paying for your retirement, and many other services for your leisure (or for the legal residents already here). For many of them this money will not be recovered and it shouldn't, because they were not supposed to be here in the first place right?
Yet nobody seems to discuss the billions of dollars going to waste!! Right?
I agree with you on the unfortunate number of illegal residents, that simply will not offer any benefits to this country (because they are under skilled, without higher education, they are just, cheap labor), and should not be given higher benefits (like a green card, or making them eligible for government help or benefits). Yet that does not mean throwing them out from here like garbage, they contribute too. I think they should be allowed to legally work (working permit and license) and live freely (be able to travel), unless they are convicted criminals or terrorists. Illegal residents that have lived illegally for more than 13 years, have no criminal record and have been paying taxes should be given that opportunity.
Yet in the other hand, the students that have lived here and had no will against entering the country illegally (because they were under the age of 15) have gone through the intensive American school training, and are capable of giving higher benefits back to the community should not be betrayed. It is simply a waste for this society to discard them. The people that do qualify and can give benefits back to this country should at least be given one chance to succeed.
With thousands and thousands of universities and schools of trade, I find it unlikely "your child" will be missing out. Give higher education a chance, to those who deserve it at least.
I am a Naturalized American Citizen, lobbing for the DREAM ACT to pass in 2005.

Wed, 09/01/2004 - 17:29
John S Bolton
www.johnsbolton.net

There's another one, even more emotional, in the same copy of the NYT. It's about a wetback who needs a heart transplant, who is going to die at Bellevue (a NYC public hospital which has become known in the farthest corners of the 3rd world for taking intractable cases for free). The whole tenor is why don't you just feel it, everyone must want to share out his neighbor's tax money, to make up for the failures of every tropical country. Then they back it up with a threat, his relatives say they will stay here. Another common feature of the above sub-genre is the smear against the restrictionists. In the HS article, the term cultural nativists is used, and contrasted with free-marketeers, as if to suggest that it would be impossible to maintain a superior culture, except through socialism or some kind of anti-capitalism. The more important possibility, which is ruled out in the above classification of the right into two clashing groups, is that one may believe that one's culture is superior for objective reasons, not just because it's our people, and that the expansion of socialism by means of mass immigration into the welfare-socialist society, is a major threat to that culture.

Wed, 09/01/2004 - 16:51
John S Bolton
www.johnsbolton.net

This one was not so thoroughly emotive as others, in that it had some appeal to intellect mixed in. What these pieces have in common is also the failure to mention that the suggested generosities are to be gotten by aggression on the net taxpayer, and would involve traitorous activity on the part of officals, diverting tax money to hostile foreigners in the country. Cultural nativism vs.free-marketeers; what a grand level of consideration! Or so it would be, if it were not very slave-marketeerish to want to intensify the bite of the welfare society, by means of mass anti-merit immigration.